Wednesday, July 27, 2016

The Hard Top / Hard Dodger. *Part 3*

So I have finally finished the bottom of the hardtop. I have painted and set all the
Polycarbonate glass in place. No pics of the process. I built it all from scratch. I made patterns for all the glass and frames for the glass.

 
From Hardtop2


From Hardtop2



Now I have to finish the top. More glass, then paint.

From Hardtop2



Thursday, July 21, 2016

The Hard Top / Hard Dodger. *Part 2*

So now we have the top up on the boat. I built an adjustable jig to hold it so I could get the right height and location. Here are some pics with the process of fitting the top to the bottom rail I had made earlier.

By the way, this was the most difficult part.

From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


Starting to look good. I think.

From Update_July 20, 2016


Looking lean and mean.
Dirty boat.

From Update_July 20, 2016


Ok now we have it together (barely). So let's lift it off and to the ground.

From Update_July 20, 2016


 
From Update_July 20, 2016

From Update_July 20, 2016


On the work horses for final assembly and finishing.

From Update_July 20, 2016




The Hard Top / Hard Dodger. *Part 1*

So here we go. This was spread over about a year. First I made the actual top piece, then the bottom rail was made right on the boat. Then I built the gantry crane to set the top piece up there and join the two together.

I started with a table to make the mahogany ribs that are internal to the top.

Made with OSB, filled with thickened epoxy, sanded, then clear coated with epoxy again to give a nice smooth surface then waxed about 8 times so the glue would not stick to the form.

From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


Next a large form was made that matched the same curve as the ribs. I did not take pics of that part. I have a few of the actual glue up of the top piece.

From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


There is a layer of 1/4" luan on top and bottom. Mahogany ribs with 1/2"foam panel between them with solid Mahogany about a foot around the edges.

I used plastic nails to nail the first layer to the form. This allowed easy removal and sanding. I used a cheap Harbor Freight 18Ga. nail gun. Worked great and saved about $300 from buying a Italian gun made for them.

Later I cut it to shape and glassed it top and bottom.

 
From July 21, 2016


 
From July 21, 2016


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Name on the boat.

A week left to take it to the marina. 10 years of work nearly done. Got the name on today. I will also post some info on the hard top/dodger that I designed and built.

From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


It means "Sunshine" in Spanish.

Adding a wheel to the dinghy.

Wouldn't it be nice to just wheel your dinghy down to the beach or up the beach? I got the idea from Harry Bryan in Canada.
http://www.harrybryan.com/harrybryan/

Some Pics of what I did.

From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


From Update_July 20, 2016


Installed. I had to cut a hole in the boat and build a well for it. Not hard and no
maintenance issuses with the 1" stainless tube and plastic parts. 

From Update_July 20, 2016



Wednesday, May 14, 2014

Working wooden boats are not DEAD.

In Apalachicola Florida, real wooden work boats still exist and are still being built new.
This is for the oystering fishery. Made from mostly pressure treated plywood and lumber from the local hardware/lumber store.
They use things like parts of auto engines for anchors.
Many times when they reach the end of their working life they are allowed to rot back into the ground. That's true recycling.

As I live not far from here, I would like to share some photos I took at a new museum in Eastpoint Florida, on the other side of the bay from Apalach.
This is one of the last places in Florida where the old Florida still exist. See it before it's gone. Buy Oysters.

On with the show.

The following boat was built for the museum, but identical to actual working boats.

From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


Inside shots.

From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


In The museum. Some models.

From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


The older sailing version of the oystering boats no longer used.
A model .

From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


From Apalachicola Oystering Boats


Sorry for the glare, but they where in a glass case.

The Museum is the: Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve


http://www.dep.state.fl.us/coastal/sites/apalachicola/

http://nerrs.noaa.gov/Reserve.aspx?ResID=APA

 Working sail is something I think our governments should foster. It would be harder for the fishermen, but restrictions and limits could be lifted, thereby promoting the fishery.
If this where done across the board with all fisheries,
or at least have working sail only zones, this would help the fish population and the fishermen who would fish under sail.
This is actually used in Great Britain in sail only fisheries that are hundreds of years old, and their fishermen earn a living from the sea still today.

http://www.falmouthoysterfestival.co.uk/fishing.html


Monday, May 12, 2014

The Bends ...... Bending shower curtain track.

So just how do you do it with out it collapsing?
First I borrowed a Harbor Freight bender from a friend of mine to see if I could do it.
Then I had to make a jig to work with the bender. Lastly, test on some scrap ( old piece).
 The Jig build.

From update _10_1_2012


From update _10_1_2012


From update _10_1_2012


With me so far? The half inch ply was a perfect fit. But if not I would have glued spacers in if needed.

On the bender.
From update _10_1_2012


From update _10_1_2012


Ok, so what is the secret ingredient? I actually found it on an Chinese industrial website for industrial benders. Dead simple when you know.
It is a spacer/filler. Made from a piece of scrap plastic/Delrin.

From update _10_1_2012


Insert it in the track. It MUST be a tight fit.

From update _10_1_2012


From update _10_1_2012


Now bend it.

From update _10_1_2012


First test on scrap. Then buy some track. I got mine here: http://www.curtain-tracks.com/  My problem was I had to match my current track. If you don't have to do this, then you may want to go a different route.

From update _10_1_2012


More bending.
From update _10_1_2012


Finished piece.
From update _10_1_2012


I hope this helps anyone who needs to bend some track. It's not hard and can be done fairly inexpensively. If you have friend with a bender. I should say that of course this is not the only way to do it. It's just the way I did it.